“The Sales Moment; Issue #232″

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Have you ever been so sure about something, only to find out you were completely wrong?young woman carefully listening  with her hands behind the ears

There may be few of you that are arrogant enough to say, “nope…never!” But for the rest of us, we have all been wrong about something. And if we have been wrong once, is it possible we could be wrong again?

Assumption can be particularly dangerous when it comes to communication and relationships. To assume you know how another person is feeling or thinking about a particular situation can be a disaster. At the root of every miscommunication is an assumption.

Do you openly give unsolicited advice to someone who has been through a tragic loss or difficult life event without knowing fully the depth of pain and despair they are experiencing? Your heart may be in the right place but trying to “fix” them may only lead to more grief. The best way to help is to be supportive and present.

As a salesperson, do you assume you know your prospect’s needs before they tell you? You have made this presentation numerous times. You know the questions they will ask and why your product is the best solution. Right? Wrong!

You cannot begin to understand the thinking of another person until you ask questions and listen carefully to their answers. Our goal should be clear communication and by clear I mean that both parties fully understand one another.

In his best selling book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, Stephen R. Covey entitled Habit 5 as Seek First to Understand, Then to Be Understood. He defines emphatic listening as listening with the intent to understand.

Here is an excerpt:

We typically seek first to be understood. Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply. They’re either speaking or preparing to speak. They’re filtering everything through their own paradigms, reading their autobiography into other people’s lives.

Do you make assumptions like, “Oh, I know exactly how you feel” and, “I went through the very same thing, let me tell you about my experience.” If you’re not sure, ask someone close to you that will tell you the truth.

We have opportunities to practice the habit of emphatic listening every day with co-workers, customers, friends and family. We just have to make a conscious effort.

Have a great week!

“The Sales Moment; Issue #231″

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Some people believe they can get ahead by being deceptive. Effective leaders know that integrity is the greatest attribute to build long-term relationships and trust.Integrity on Wooden Piece Arranged by Businessman

While Lesa and I were shopping and test driving vehicles recently, we encountered a young man who made a critical error in his selling approach. On two separate occasions during our conversation he insinuated that lying was not only appropriate but also encouraged by his sales manager.

The first incident occurred when we asked about a particular feature of the vehicle. He said, “It doesn’t have that feature but my sales manager said I could say it did.”

He then encouraged me to use my company car gas card for this vehicle for an upcoming road trip. He assured me, “They will never know.”

This impressionable young salesman destroyed his credibility with us. We are all responsible for our own character and integrity. What makes this particular situation worse is the negative influence of his boss encouraging the young man to use deception to close the deal.

What impression are you leaving with your customers or the people you lead?

Why should we be concerned with having integrity? Trust. Integrity earns trust. Trust is the bedrock for building strong relationships.

Trust is the glue of life. It’s the most essential ingredient in effective communication. It’s the foundational principle that holds all relationships.

~ Stephen Covey

The most effective communicators and leaders know that people appreciate transparency and truth. Whether the news is good or bad, they know it is better to be forthright, honest and timely.

John Maxwell said it well in his blog Adopt the Golden Rule as the Integrity Guideline for Your Life:

If you desire for your life to have meaning, then you must choose some principle to live by. I’d like to make a case for the Golden Rule. I believe asking the question, “How would I like to be treated in this situation?” is an effective integrity guideline for any situation.

Are you treating people the way you want to be treated?

Have a great week!

John D. Smith “Storm Stoppers” Interview

Storm Stoppers

 

Join Pierce as he interviews John D. Smith, creator of Storm Stoppers who appeared on Shark Tank Season 6, Episode 9.

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